This is a collection of letters between Parker Hale Hitchcock and his family written during the War of the Rebellion. They were transcribed from the originals as they appear by the great-granddaughter of Frank Lincoln Hitchcock, the baby in these letters. We thank her and her family for making us aware of them and these photographs, sharing them with us and giving us permission to make them public here. They will be annotated and updated as information becomes available.

  

The Hitchcock Siblings      

 Front row L-R: Hale, Mary & George                         Back row L-R: Warren, Frank & Charles  

  

Father: Luke Hitchcock 1805-1886                                                      Mother: Margaret Brown c1822-1874

 

Parker Hale Hitchcock was born 1 Sep 1843 in Essex, Middlesex County, Connecticut, USA to Margaret Brown and Luke Hitchcock who was then a Methodist itinerant preacher like his father, Barnabas Hitchcock, and his brother, Peter M Hitchcock.  (Hale was the oldest child of the second family of Luke Hitchcock. Luke was the father by his first wife, Esther Corey, of 5 other children including Wilbur Fisk Hitchcock and Peter McKinney Hitchcock of the Hitchcock Letters.) 

When Hale was young, his father moved the family almost annually. Hale's sister, Mary, was born in Munson Township, Geauga, Ohio on 25 Jan 1845. In the fall of 1845, Luke Hitchcock became the first pastor of the Baptist church in Sheboygan, Wisconsin where George was born on 13 Sep 1846. In January 1848, Luke was pastor of the Free Will Baptist Church in Dale, Town of Middlebury, Wyoming, New York where Warren was born on 2 Oct 1848. In 1849, Luke was pastor of the Free Will Baptist Church in Warsaw, Wyoming, New York where Charles was born on 9 Aug 1850. Hale and the family were listed in Warsaw in the 1850 U.S. Census. In 1851, Luke was pastor of the Baptist Church in Varysburg, Wyoming, New York. In 1852, the family lived in Cowlesville, Wyoming, New York before moving to Depauville, Jefferson, New York in 1853. In 1854, they moved to Stone Mills, Town of Orleans, Jefferson, New York where they appeared in the June 1855 New York Census; after which they moved to Redwood, Jefferson, New York. Sometime in 1856, the family moved to Marilla, Erie, New York. In the 1860 U.S. Census, they were in the Town of Marilla, Erie, New York. Frank was born there on 4 Jul 1862. The family remained in Marilla throughout the Civil War.

 

The American Civil War (1861 to 1865) was fought between the northern states, also known as the Union, the North, the Federals, and the southern states who had seceded from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America, also known as the Confederacy, the South, the Rebels.

 

Harper's Weekly, February 23, 1861, p. 124

from http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1861/February/confederate-states-map.htm

 

On 9 Oct 1861, Hale, having turned 18 the previous month, enlisted in the army for a 3-year stint. He would have signed a form as shown below; the only difference being that the New York State document replaced the eagle with this emblem:

 

 

 

Hardtack and Coffee or The Unwritten Story of Army Life, John D. Billings, 1887, p. 200-201

 

 

On 9 Nov 1861, Hale mustered in to the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers in Buffalo, Erie, New York as a private in the infantry, Company K.  

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

Parker Hale Hitchcock - map

 

And the letter-writing commenced.

 

I     Buffalo, New York

1.    14 Nov 1861 

2.    14 Nov 1861

3.    17 Nov 1861

4.    24 Nov 1861

5.    26 Nov 1861

6.      3 Dec 1861

7.      8 Dec 1861

8.    15 Dec 1861

9.    22 Dec 1861

10.  27 Dec 1861

11.  27 Dec 1861

12.    7 Jan 1862 

13.    1 Feb 1862

14.   13 Feb 1862

15.   26 Feb 1862

 

II    On the Move

16.   10 Mar 1862

17.   14 Mar 1862

18.   26 Mar 1862

19.     5 Apr 1862

20.     7 Apr 1862

21.   19 Apr 1862

22.   26 Apr 1862

23.   20 Jun 1862

24.   22 Jun 1862

25.   11 Jul 1862

26.   29 Jul 1862

27.    9 Aug 1862

28.  10 Aug 1862

29.  22 Aug 1862

30.    1 Sep 1862

31.    4 Sep 1862

32.   30 Sep 1862

33.   25 Oct 1862

34.   14 Dec 1862

III   Hospitals

35.   19 Jan 1863

36.   30 Jan 1863

37.    8 Feb 1863

38.   16 Feb 1863

39.   16 Feb 1863

40.   8 & 16 Feb 1863

41.   20 Feb 1863

42.   27 Feb 1863

43.     6 Mar 1863

44.   18 Mar 1863

45.     1 Apr 1863

46.   16 Apr 1863

47.    5 May 1863

 

These are all the letters that we have of Hale's correspondence with his family.

  

From his military record (which is incomplete), we know that Hale remained at Turner's Lane Hospital June, July & August 1863. The hospital muster roll also shows he was paid 30 Jun 1863.                                                

 Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

According to his military record, on 11 Jun 1863, while still at Turner's Lane Hospital, Hale was transferred from Company K to Company A of the 100th New York Volunteers, no reason given. At this time both companies were with their regiment on Folly Island, South Carolina near Charleston. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, 1870, Ch XXV

 

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration


Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

  

*As stated in correspondence from the War Department, the Adjutant General's Office, dated 7 Jan 1914, Parker Hale Hitchcock was transferred directly from Company K, 100 NY Volunteers to the Invalid Corps. He never actually joined Company A. See pension papers below.

 

According to Hale's Veteran Reserve Corps file, he appeared on the 6 Co., 1 Battalion Invalid Corps Muster Roll as of 12 Sep 1863. Prior to that he had been continuously in the hospital in Philadelphia, as per correspondence from the War Department, the Adjutant General's Office, Washington, December 26, 1913. See pension papers below.

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration 

 

On 15 Nov 1863, Hale was officially transferred to the Invalid Corps. 

The Invalid Corps "was an outgrowth of the unofficial practice of employing soldiers who were unfit for combat (due to injuries or illness) to assist in hospital work and other non-combat duties." The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference, 2002, p. 441The Invalid Corps was formed by General Order No. 105 on 28 April 1863 and the organization was laid out in General Order No. 212 on 9 July 1863. The name was changed to Veteran Reserve Corps by General Order No. 111 on 18 Mar 1864. For more information, see Veteran Reserve Corps Report, 30 Nov 1865,  p. 543-568.

 

Even though Hale's military file does not indicate where he was stationed, we surmise that it was most likely at Camp Cadwalader Invalid Corps, Philadelphia, located between Smallpox Hospital and Turner's Lane Hospital. 

 

Military Map of Philadelphia 1861-1865

Library of Congress

 

Hale was present in the Company Muster Roll of 84 Co., 1 Battalion Invalid Corps for Sep., Oct., Nov., & Dec., 1863. He was paid 31 Dec 1863.

 

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration 

 

In Jan. & Feb., 1864, Hale was present on the Company Muster Roll for Co. F, 21 Regiment Invalid Corps.

In Mar., Apr., May & June, 1864, Hale was present on the Company Muster Roll for Co. F, 21 Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps.

 

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

Hale was present on the Company Muster Roll for Co. F, 21 Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps for July, Aug., Sep. & Oct., 1864, with the following notations: July 1864 conducting substitutes to Alexandria, VA since July 29, 1864; Sept 1864 to Louisville, KY with recruits.

 

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

 

"Veteran Reserve Corps Bureau Report, November 30, 1865", The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series III - Volume V, page 565

 

 

Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

 

 Military Service Records, U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

Parker Hale Hitchcock, Private, Co. F, 21 Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps mustered out 8 Nov 1864 at Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, PA. He was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of service, 3 years. It appears from his Individual Muster-out Roll that he was due $100. According to correspondence from the Treasury Department dated 22 Dec 1913, Hale was paid "to include November 7, 1864, on an individual muster-out roll dated Philadelphia, Pa, November 8, 1864,". See pension papers below.

 

 

Military Service Records,  U.S. National Archives & Records Administration

 

Post War 

Upon his discharge, Hale returned home to Marilla, Erie, New York. In the spring of 1865, his parents moved to Oceana county, Michigan. Hale followed in August 1865 and resided there until his death.

We have been unable to locate Hale or his brothers, George and Charles, in the 1870 U.S. Census taken in September. His parents and other siblings were listed in Oceana county, Michigan.

On 23 Oct 1870, Parker Hale Hitchcock, 27, of Hart, Oceana, Michigan, farmer, married Sarah Amanda Scoville, 17, of Hart, Oceana, Michigan, in Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, by Luke Hitchcock, minister, father of the groom.

On 13 Aug 1871, a daughter, Nettie M, was born to Parker H. Hitchcock, farmer, and Sarah A. Hitchcock in Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

On 12 Oct 1874, Hale's mother, Margaret Brown 52, died of dysentery in Hart Township and was buried in South Hart Cemetery, Hart, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

On 31 Oct 1874, a daughter, Lena Margaret, was born to Parker H. Hitchcox, farmer, and Amanda Hitchcox in Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

  

This is an enlarged part of a map of Oceana County, Michigan showing the location of Hale Hitchcock's property of 20 acres in 1876.

Topographical Map of Oceana Co., Michigan, 1876, Library of Congress

 

In the 1880 U.S. Census, taken on 7 & 8 June, Hale Hitchcock 37, farmer; Amanda 27, wife, keeping house; Nettie 7, daughter, at school; Lena 5, daughter, were listed in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

 

As called for by Senate Resolution on December 8, 1882 to the Commissioner of Pensions, the United States Pension Bureau published List of Pensioners on the Roll January 1, 1883: Giving the Name of Each Pensioner, the Cause for Which Pensioned, the Post-Office Address, the Rate of Pension per Month, and the Date of Original Allowance; in 5 volumes. There were 17 names listed for Shelby post office, Oceana, Michigan. Parker Hale Hitchcock was not one of them.

 

On 10 July 1886, Parker Hale Hitchcock's father, Luke Hitchcock 81, died of typhoid fever in Oceana County, and was buried on 11 July 1886 in South Hart Cemetery, Hart, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

 

For background on pensions, please read the following:

Costa, Dora L. "Appendix A: Union Army Pensions and Civil War Records." The Evolution of Retirement: An American Economic History, 1880-1990 January 1998, National Bureau of Economic Research

Hunt, Gaillard. "The United States Pension Office." The Atlantic Monthly January 1890, p. 18-23.

Prechtel-Klustens, Claire. "A Reasonable Degree of Promptitude: Civil War Pension Application Processing, 1861-1885." Prologue Magazine Spring 2010, Vol. 42, No. 1. National Archives   

 

In the 1890 U.S. Census Special Schedule for Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows, etc. of the War of the Rebellion, taken in June in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, USA, Hale P Hitchcock, Private, Co K 100 Regiment NY Infantry, 3-year service, was listed with having incurred a disability - chronic diarrhea since 1862.

 

I  According to Parker Hale Hitchcock's Civil War pension application file from the U.S. National Archives & Records Administration, his first Declaration for Invalid Pension was 25 Aug 1890. He was 46 years old, even though he states his age as 47. His birthday was 1 September.

 Declaration for Invalid Pension  25 August 1890

 

 Physician's Affidavit  11 March 1891

 

Surgeon's Certificate  2 September 1891 

 

 Rejection for declaration filed 27 August 1890

 

In the 1894 Michigan State Census, Soldiers of the Civil War, taken 1 June, Parker H. Hitchcock, was in Shelby Township, Oceana County.

 

II  Declaration for Invalid Pension  1894  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 50 years old

 

Declaration for Invalid Pension  14 April 1894

 

Physician's Affidavit   16 April 1894

 

Surgeon's Certificate  11 July 1894

 

 

 Rejection for declaration filed 25 April 1894

 

III  Declaration for Invalid Pension  1894  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 51 years old

 

Declaration for Invalid Pension  24 October 1894

 

Rejection for declaration filed 24 October 1894

 

This is an enlarged part of a map of Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan showing the location of Parker Hale Hitchcock's property of 14.36 acres in 1895. It is marked with his wife's initial's Sarah Amanda. 

Oceana County, Michigan, Topography, Biography, History, Art Folio, 1895, page 24

 

IV   Declaration for Invalid Pension  1896  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 52 years old

 

Declaration for Invalid Pension  11 July 1896

 

Surgeon's Certificate   21 October 1896

 

Ratable disability shown  -  Medical Referee  9 February 1897

 

 

Pension of $6 approved for declaration filed 24 July 1896

 

V  Declaration for Increase of Pension  1897  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 54 years old

 

Declaration for Increase of Pension  9 November 1897 

 

Pension Affidavit  8 January 1898

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  24 October 1898

 

Surgeon's Certificate  2 November 1898

 

Pension increase to $8 approved for declaration filed 24 November 1897

 

In the 1900 U.S. Census, taken on 13 June, Hale P Hitchcock 56, farmer; Sarah A 47, wife; Lena M 25, daughter, berry picker; Cecil Hale 2, grandson; Alfred B Covey 21, boarder, salesman, were listed in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, USA. According to the census form, Hale owned the farm free from mortgage.

 

VI  Declaration for Invalid Pension  1901  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 57 years old

 

Declaration for Invalid Pension  13 July 1901

 

Physician's Affidavit  21 September 1901

 

Surgeon's Certificate  4 December 1901

 

Rejection for Pension Increase for declaration filed  18 July 1901   Remains at $8

 

VII  Declaration for Increase of Invalid Pension 1907  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 63 years old

 

 

Declaration for Increase of Invalid Pension  14 February 1907 

 

Pension increase to $12 approved for declaration filed 16 February 1907

 

In the 1910 U.S. Census, taken in April, Hale Hitchcock 66, farmer; Sarah A 57, wife; Matilda Bryan 83, mother-in-law; Cecil White 12, grandson, were listed in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, USA. According to the census form, Hale owned the farm.

 

VIII   Declaration for Pension  1912  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 68 years old

 

Declaration for Pension  21 May 1912

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  24 October 1912

 

Pension increase to $17 approved for declaration filed 23 May 1912

 

This is an enlarged part of a map of Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan showing the location of Parker Hale Hitchcock's property in 1913.

Standard Atlas of Oceana County, Michigan Including a Plat Book of the Villages, Cities and Townships of the County, 1913, page 48

 

IX  Pension Application  1913 - Parker Hale Hitchcock 70 years old

 

 

Letter written by Parker Hale Hitchcock  13 September 1913

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  1 November 1913

 

 

 

Affidavit of Parker Hale Hitchcock  20 November 1913

**Our research shows that Hale's father, Rev. Luke Hitchcock, was first a Wesleyan Methodist minister and then became a Free-Will Baptist minister.

 

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  4 December 1913

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  11 December 1913

 

Correspondence - Treasury Department  22 December 1913

 

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  11 December 1913

 

 

 Correspondence - War Department  26 December 1913

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  3 January 1914

 

Correspondence - War Department  7 January 1914

 

 Pension increase to $23 approved for letter filed 17 September 1913

**This form also shows a pension increase to $30 effective 1 September 1918.

**This form also shows a pension increase to $40 effective 10 June 1918.

 

***************************************************************

Absent Without Proper Authority

 

General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force: Adjutant General's Office, United States War Department, 1862, page 38

 

...There is always confusion and haste in shipping and taking care of wounded after a battle; there is no time for nice examination of permits to pass here or there. ...

 

Report: Army of the Potomac, United States Congress: Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 1863, page 344

  

General Orders of the War Department, Embracing the Years 1861, 1862 & 1863, Vol I, War Department, 1864,  page 351

 

Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

        GENERAL: In compliance with the directions contained in your communication of January 20, 1863, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the medical department of this army from July 4, 1862, to November 7, 1862, viz:

...The army when it reached Harrison's Landing was greatly exhausted. The malaria from the borders of the Chickahominy and from the swamps throughout the Peninsula to which it had been so freely exposed now began to manifest its baneful effects upon the health of the men. In addition to this the troops, just previous to their arrival at this point, had been marching and fighting for seven days and nights in a country abounding in pestilential swamps and traversed by streams greatly swollen by the heavy rains, which made that region almost a Sarbonean bog. The labors of the troops had been excessive, the excitement intense. They were called upon to subsist upon a scanty supply of food, and but little time even to prepare the meager allowance. They had little time for sleep, and even when the chance presented itself it was to lie in the rain and mud, with the expectation of being called to arms at any moment. The marching and fighting in such a country, with such weather, with lack of food, want of rest, great excitement, and the depression necessarily consequent upon it, could not have other than the effect of greatly increasing the numbers of sick in the army after it reached Harrison's Landing....

...Colonel Ingalls made every effort in his power to aid in removing the sick, and placed at different times boats temporarily at my disposal for this purpose, amounting in all to ten. Some of these could make but one trip; others made more, and carried in all, from the 9th to the night of the 15th of August, 5,945 men; 1,908 were sent away before the 9th on the regular transports. The total number sent away consequent upon the movement of the army was 14,159. The largest number of boats was obtained on the 15th, and on that day and night 5,629 were sent away....

...Out of 3,000 cases examined upon our arrival at Fortress Monroe 600 were fit for duty and ordered to their regiments....

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JONATHAN LETTERMAN, 

Surgeon, U. S. Army, and Medical Director Army of the Potomac.

 The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I Vol XI Part I, 1884, page 210 

 

The History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York Volunteerspages 90-94, had the men leaving Harrison's Landing on 10-11 Aug and heading south, crossing the Chickahominy River on 17 Aug and setting up camp 4 miles past Williamsburg the next day, 18 Aug 1862. These were hard to severe marches. Once encamped, the army was mustered for pay, inspected and, as per General Order No. 102, all absentees marked. 

 

The War of the Rebellion: A compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series III Vol II, War Department, 1899, page 348

  

According to correspondence from the War Department, dated 26 Dec 1913, in Hale's pension file (see above), "Nothing has been found of record to show [Parker Hale Hitchcock's] whereabouts or the cause of his absence from August 18, 1862 to January 8, 1863 [when he was admitted to Union Hotel General Hospital in Georgetown, D.C.], nor has anything been found to show that he was tried by court martial or that he was restored to duty without trial." 

There was no communication in Hale's pension file indicating that he clarified his absence or appealed the resulting forfeiture of pay. According to the approval document for pension letter filed 17 September 1913 (see above) – Length of pensionable service:  2 years, 2 months, 8 days, – Deductions in service: 9 months, 22 days for desertion. The deduction did not match his absence (18 Aug 1862 - 8 Jan 1863) which was under 5 months. There was no explanation for the discrepancy.

We can track Hale from his letters:

9 Aug 1862 was written from Harrison's Landing, VA.

30 Sep 1862 was written from Washington, D.C. in which he mentioned a letter sent from Mill Creek Hospital near Fortress Monroe which we do not have. Hale did not say when (It had to have been between 9 & 18 Aug) or why he was in hospital or what transport he used to get to Washington. He then spent time in a camp for new recruits.

25 Oct 1862 was written from Washington, D.C. He told his parents to direct their letter to Co. K  25th NJ Vol, Washington, D.C.

14 Dec 1862 was written from Washington, D.C. He instructed his parents to write to Hale Hitchcock, Washington, D.C., no company or regiment.

19 Jan 1863 was written from Union Hotel Hospital, Georgetown, D.C. Hale said that he had had a running sore on his foot for 2 months.

 

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In pursuance of the twenty-sixth section of the act of Congress entitled "An act for enrolling and calling out the national forces, and for other purposes," approved on the 3d day of March, 1863, I, Abraham Lincoln, President and Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby order and command that all soldiers enlisted or drafted in the service of the United States now absent from their regiments without leave shall forthwith return to their respective regiments.

And I do hereby declare and proclaim that all soldiers now absent from their respective regiments without leave who shall, on or before the 1st day of April, 1863, report themselves at any rendezvous designated by the general orders of the War Department No. 58, hereto annexed, may be restored to their respective regiments without punishment, except the forfeiture of pay and allowances during their absence; and all who do not return within the time above specified shall be arrested as deserters and punished as the law provides: and

Whereas evil-disposed and disloyal persons at sundry places have enticed and procured soldiers to desert and absent themselves from their regiments, thereby weakening the strength of the armies and prolonging the war, giving aid and comfort to the enemy, and cruelly exposing the gallant and faithful soldiers remaining in the ranks to increased hardships and danger:

I do therefore call upon all patriotic and faithful citizens to oppose and resist the aforementioned dangerous and treasonable crimes, and to aid in restoring to their regiments all soldiers absent without leave, and to assist in the execution of the act of Congress "for enrolling and calling out the national forces, and for other purposes," and to support the proper authorities in the prosecution and punishment of offenders against said act and in suppressing the insurrection and rebellion.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

Done at the city of Washington, this 10th day of March, A. D. 1863, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh.

 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Abraham Lincoln: "Proclamation - Recalling Soldiers to Their Regiments," March 10, 1863. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley,The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=69889.

 

For more information, read the following:

Lonn, Ella, Desertion During the Civil War, 1928

Munson, Major Edward L., Military Absenteeism in War, With Special Reference to the Relation of the Medical Department Thereto, The Association of Military Surgeons, 1912

Reid, Brian Holden & John White, "'A Mob of Stragglers and Cowards': Desertion From the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-65", Journal of Strategic Studies Vol 8, Issue 1, 1985, pages 64-77 

 

"The number of missing and of deserters––it is impossible here, because of the method of keeping the records, to discriminate between those taken prisoner by the enemy and those deliberately taking advantage of the confusion to slip away––..." Desertion During the Civil War, page 145 

"The first, and fundamentally essential step for both the unconscious or criminal malingerers in the production of such military absenteeism as is obtainable through the Medical Department, consists in securing enrollment on sick report and classification as part of the military disabled." Military Absenteeism, page 35

"A deserter was a soldier who left the army with no intention of returning." A Mob of Stragglers, page 64 

"The term desertion was also applied popularly not only to 'absence without leave' but also to 'straggling', 'skulking' (the avoidance of military service by fraud, such as securing forged parole papers, furloughs or exemptions, collusion with medical boards, or the bribing of junior officers in pretending disability) and 'loafing', as indicated by the large numbers of officers that hung about their hotels in Washington."  A Mob of Stragglers, page 65 

***************************************************************

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  16 August 1915

 

In the 1920 U.S. Census, taken on 2 January, Parker H Hitchcock 76, farmer; Amandy 65, wife; Cecil Shay 22, grandson, laborer at basket factory, were listed in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, USA. According to the census form, Hale owned the home which was mortgaged.

 

 X  Declaration for Pension Increase 1921  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 77 years old

 

Declaration for Pension Increase  3 January 1921

 

 

Affidavit by Sarah A Hitchcock  3 January 1921

 

Affidavit for Pension Increase  4 January 1921

**Date was incorrect. Parker Hale Hitchcock would have been 77 years old on 1 Sep 1920.

 

 

Physician's Affidavit  3 January 1921

**Date was incorrect. Parker Hale Hitchcock would have been 77 years old on 1 Sep 1920.

  

Pension increase to $72 approved for declaration filed 7 January 1921

**On this form, the previous pension rate was $50 but there is no declaration in the file.

 

 Pension Book 

**According to this, the pension increase to $50 was effective 1 May 1920.

 

XI  Application for Total Disability Pension  1928  -  Parker Hale Hitchcock 84 years old

 

 

Correspondence - Total Disability Pension Application  21 March 1928 

 

 

 Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  7 April 1928

 

On 19 Feb 1929, Parker Hale Hitchcock died in Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA of uremia (kidney failure), at the age of 85. He was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA.

Oceana [Michigan] Herald, Friday, 22 February, 1929

Oceana County Historical & Genealogical Society, Hart, Oceana, Michigan, USA

 

 **Parker Hale Hitchcock's father, Luke Hitchcock, was born in Lower Canada & his mother, Margaret Brown, was born in Ireland.

 

 

 

War Department  -  Application for Headstone   18 May 1929

 

Mount Hope Cemetery, Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA

Find a Grave Memorial #133354738 created by J. Stout 

 

 

Pension Payment Record for Parker Hale Hitchcock

 

Declaration for Widow's Pension  1929  -  Sarah Amanda Scoville Hitchcock 75 years old

 

 

Correspondence - Bureau of Pensions  23 February 1929 

 

Declaration for Widow's Pension  11 March 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  15 May 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  14 September 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  14 September 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  14 September 1929

 

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  19 September 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  21 September 1929

 

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  10 December 1929

 

Correspondence  -  Widow Division  23 December 1929

 

 

 Widow's Pension of $40 approved for declaration filed 14 March 1929

 

In the 1930 U.S. Census, taken 5 April, Amanda S. Hitchcock, 75, widow, lived alone in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, on a farm which she owned, worth $2500.

In the 1940 U.S. Census, taken 15 April, Sarah Hitchcock, 88, widow, lived in Shelby Township, Oceana, Michigan, with her daughter, Nettie Kinsman, 68, her son-in-law, Claude Kinsman, 51, basket factory, in their house which they owned, worth $800. Also, her grandson, Gervase Cox, 34, truck driver, and his wife, Ethel Cox, 26. According to the census form, Sarah Hitchcock answered yes to income from another source.

On 22 January 1941, Sarah Amanda Scoville, widow of Parker Hale Hitchcock, died in Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA of bronchitis at the age of 87. She was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Shelby, Oceana, Michigan, USA on 25 January 1941.

 

Oceana County Historical & Genealogical Society, Hart, Oceana, Michigan, USA

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence  -  United States Post Office  31 January 1941

 

Veterans Administration  -  Death of Beneficiary